X-rays are a type of radiation called electromagnetic waves. X-ray imaging creates pictures of the inside of your body. The images show the parts of your body in different shades of black and white. This is because different tissues absorb different amounts of radiation. Calcium in bones absorbs x-rays the most, so bones look white. Fat and other soft tissues absorb less, and look gray. Air absorbs the least, so lungs look black.

An X-ray is a quick, painless test that produces images of the structures inside your body — particularly your bones.

A special X-ray machine is used to perform the exam.

What is Panoramic X-ray?

Panoramic radiography, also called panoramic x-ray, is a two-dimensional (2-D) dental x-ray examination that captures the entire mouth in a single image, including the teeth, upper and lower jaws, surrounding structures and tissues.
The jaw is a curved structure similar to that of a horseshoe. However, the panoramic x-ray produces a flat image of the curved structure. It is typically set to provide details of the bones and teeth.

An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with x-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.

Unlike a traditional intraoral x-ray where the film is placed inside of the mouth, the film for a panoramic x-ray is contained inside of the machine.

Our PaX-i3D Smart system provides the most precise and high quality panoramic image.

Clear and sharp panoramic image brings you better diagnostics.
Enhanced details especially in the anterior and dental roots can be viewed
The PaX-i3D Smart system includes a Cone Beam CT sensor which allows 3D Diagnostic images to be available to physician instantly. The large scanned area can provide more extended oral information on the maxillary or mandibular areas. An accurate treatment plan can be established by taking into account the major anatomical structures like mandibular nerve, mental foramen, or maxillary sinus.

The PaX-i3D Smart also provides optimal images with an exclusively designed sensor for cephalometric diagnosis.

What are some common uses of the procedure?

A panoramic x-ray is a commonly performed examination by dentists and oral surgeons in everyday practice and is an important diagnostic tool. It covers a wider area than a conventional intraoral x-ray and, as a result, provides valuable information about the nasal area, maxillary sinuses, tooth positioning and gum and bone irregularities. This examination is also used to plan treatment for full and partial dentures, braces, extractions and implants.

A panoramic x-ray can also reveal the presence of an existing issue or potential problem such as:

  • Advanced periodontal disease
  • Oral cysts
  • Tumors and oral cancer
  • Impacted teeth
  • Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJ)
  • Sinusitis

How should I prepare?

A panoramic x-ray examination requires no special preparation.
You will be asked to wear a lead apron as a safety precaution to protect the rest of your body from any radiation exposure that may scatter from the panoramic x-ray beam. You may also be asked to remove your jewelry from the region being imaged, eye glasses and any metal objects that might interfere with the x-ray images.

Women should always inform their dentist or oral surgeon if there is any possibility that they are pregnant. Many imaging tests are not performed during pregnancy so as not to expose the fetus to radiation. If an x-ray is necessary, precautions will be taken to minimize radiation exposure to the baby.

How does the procedure work?

During a panoramic x-ray examination, the x-ray tube rotates in a semicircle around the patient’s head, starting at one side of the jaw and ending at the other side.

Rather than relying on film placed inside the mouth, a panoramic x-ray machine projects a beam through the patient onto film or a detector rotating opposite the x-ray tube.

Until recently, x-ray images were maintained as hard film copy (much like a photographic negative). Today, images are digital files that are stored electronically. These stored images are easily accessible and are frequently compared to current x-ray images for diagnosis and disease management.
The digital format also allows the dentist to adjust and change the contrast, brightness and darkness of the image for better visualization of certain structures and tissues. Images on film cannot be adjusted or changed.

What are the benefits vs. risks?

Benefits

  • No radiation remains in a patient’s body after an x-ray examination.
  • X-rays usually have no side effects in the typical diagnostic range for this exam.
  • Panoramic x-rays can be used for very young children since the film does not have to be placed inside the mouth.

Risks

  • Women should always inform their dentist or oral surgeon if there is any possibility that they are pregnant.